Asking for Help by Greg Simony

**Greg Simony is the Founder of Care2Tri; a USA based non-for-profit that assists children and adults with CP participate in triathlon by using adaptive equipment to race with**

Is asking for help something that is difficult for you? Do you feel that by asking others for things, it makes you weak?

This is something I have struggled with for years. I was taught, “If you want something done; just do it yourself”. As I grew into adulthood, I learned that this motto probably is the best way to live, as many people talk a good game, yet when it comes down to it they don’t back up what they say they’re going to do. It really didn’t make sense to me because when people asked me to do something, I was always there for them. I held this motto and believed it to be the absolute truth. I was right 100% of the time. Continue reading

Equality; It’s Empowering by Leona Emberson

This summer I competed in my first season of triathlon. I was registered for my races. I picked up my race kit including my bibs, bike stickers and the appropriate swim cap for my category. Before the race I racked my bike and set up my transition area. After last minute pep talks, I headed to the start line. I swam, I biked, I ran, I finished the race. I received my finisher’s medal. I will even be receiving recognition for the top finisher for the season in my category.

Does this sound “normal” to you? If it does, then you are most likely not a Para Athlete. Continue reading

Para-Sports: My Second Chance at High Level Sports By Dave Carragher

Image of Dave Carragher and his guide running to the finish line at Paratriathlon Nationals

Dave Carragher and his guide, Carl Burgess completing the Sprint triathlon for Silver at the Paratriathlon Nationals in Kelowna, BC.

As I rode my bike down the street, or went for a run or a swim as a sighted person, no one thought anything about it. I was just seen as an active kid. As a sighted athlete, I was just another guy on the team; not a superstar by any means.

I know everyone has their place, but like many other athletes, I also realized in able-bodied sports the childhood dreams of making the pros was definitely not a realistic goal for me as my sight began to fade.

Now after I have lost my vision and I have been given the opportunities to get back into sports, my dream of being able to make the Olympic team has been restored. Only now I will have the chance to compete at the Paralympics; where I will be able to compete against other visually impaired athletes instead of fully sighted athletes as I did when I was younger and going through the process of losing my vision. Continue reading